Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music : Alt.Latino With members spread over four countries, LADAMA elegantly blends cultures and ideas. Its new album is called Oye Mujer.
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Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music

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Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music

Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music

Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music

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LADAMA is (left to right) Sara Lucas, Mafer Bandola, Daniela Serna and Lara Klaus. Their new album is called Oye Mujer. Yanin May/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Yanin May/Courtesy of the artist

LADAMA is (left to right) Sara Lucas, Mafer Bandola, Daniela Serna and Lara Klaus. Their new album is called Oye Mujer.

Yanin May/Courtesy of the artist

LADAMA's creative power is almost overwhelming. Adept at a variety of instruments and fluent in folkloric forms across Latin America, its members are prolific composers, distinctive vocal soloists and educators. Hailing from four different countries (Brazil, Colombia, Venezuela and the U.S.), they formed the band after meeting at OneBeat, a fellowship focused on songwriting and social engagement. What they learn together they share in workshops and residencies around the world, from universities to neighborhood art centers.

They do all of this while making captivating music that defies category. Oye Mujer, LADAMA's second album, was crowd-funded by fans. This week, we'll hear stories behind the songs and how recording in Brazil influenced the pan-Latinx sound. Listen in on a group of musicians discuss their music as creatively as they play it.


Songs Heard On This Episode

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