What Is Regenerative Agriculture And How Does It Work? : Short Wave Traditional farming depletes the soil and releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. But decades ago, a scientist named Rattan Lal helped start a movement based on the idea that carbon could be put back into the soil — a practice known today as "regenerative agriculture."

NPR food and agriculture correspondent Dan Charles explains how it works and why the idea is having a moment.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Farming Releases Carbon From The Earth's Soil Into The Air. Can We Put It Back?

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Farming Releases Carbon From The Earth's Soil Into The Air. Can We Put It Back?

Farming Releases Carbon From The Earth's Soil Into The Air. Can We Put It Back?

Farming Releases Carbon From The Earth's Soil Into The Air. Can We Put It Back?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903184905/903274078" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rattan Lal, an India-born scientist, has devoted his career to finding ways to capture carbon from the air and store it in soil. Ken Chamberlain/OSU/CFAES hide caption

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Ken Chamberlain/OSU/CFAES

Rattan Lal, an India-born scientist, has devoted his career to finding ways to capture carbon from the air and store it in soil.

Ken Chamberlain/OSU/CFAES

Traditional farming depletes the soil and releases carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. But decades ago, a scientist named Rattan Lal helped start a movement based on the idea that carbon could be put back into the soil — a practice known today as "regenerative agriculture."

NPR food and agriculture correspondent Dan Charles explains how it works and why the idea is having a moment.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brent Baughman, fact-checked by Emily Kwong, and edited by Geoff Brumfiel.