The Movement To Abolish Prisons And The Police : 1A "We need things like transformative and restorative justice processes to address some of these issues, rather than the knee-jerk reaction of punishment or [..] separating people who are incarcerated into the 'good people' and the 'bad people,'" author James Kilgore says.

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The Movement To Abolish Prisons And The Police

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The Movement To Abolish Prisons And The Police

1A

The Movement To Abolish Prisons And The Police

The Movement To Abolish Prisons And The Police

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/903546893/903600305" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Protesters march by a mural of Frederick Douglas, during a march in memory of Rayshard Brooks and other victims of police violence in Boston, Massachusetts. JOSEPH PREZIOSO/JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOSEPH PREZIOSO/JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

Protesters march by a mural of Frederick Douglas, during a march in memory of Rayshard Brooks and other victims of police violence in Boston, Massachusetts.

JOSEPH PREZIOSO/JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

Since the killing of George Floyd by police officers, more and more of us have been taking a critical look at the criminal justice system.

Polls show that most Americans support some kind of prison reform, but there's a group of people who want to change the system entirely.

Abolitionists advocate for the absence of punitive structures and the development of a society that doesn't use punishment as the primary solution for transgression. It's as much about building systems that support communities as it is about doing away with cages and those that lock them.

But the abolition of prisons and police are difficult for many people to imagine.

We talked about it with James Kilgore, co-director of the First Followers Reentry Program and author of "Understanding Mass Incarceration: A People's Guide to the Key Civil Rights Struggle of Our Time," Kim Wilson, co-host of the Beyond Prisons podcast and Nicole Lewis, staff writer with The Marshall Project.

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