Passion And Politics In 'Boys State' : Pop Culture Happy Hour The world of politics is not pretty, even in high school. That's one of the takeaways from the new documentary Boys State, about a week-long program sponsored by the American Legion. In it, a thousand Texas high-school boys form political parties, nominate candidates, and hold elections to form a government. The film shows how a few of these students think about politics and running for office. And it considers how they've been influenced by the last few years of American political discourse.
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Passion And Politics In 'Boys State'

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Passion And Politics In 'Boys State'

Passion And Politics In 'Boys State'

Passion And Politics In 'Boys State'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/904226126/904404958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Robert MacDougall, one of several teenage boys featured in the documentary film Boys State, on Apple TV+. Apple TV+ hide caption

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Apple TV+

Robert MacDougall, one of several teenage boys featured in the documentary film Boys State, on Apple TV+.

Apple TV+

The world of politics is not pretty, even in high school. That's one of the takeaways from the new documentary Boys State, about a week-long program sponsored by the American Legion. In it, a thousand Texas high-school boys form political parties, nominate candidates, and hold elections to form a government. The film shows how a few of these students think about politics and running for office. And it considers how they've been influenced by the last few years of American political discourse.

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The audio was produced and edited by Mike Katzif and Jessica Reedy.