'Lovecraft Country' Tours The Horrors Of America : Pop Culture Happy Hour The best horror is the horror that feels true. That's one of the reasons the new HBO series Lovecraft Country works. Set in the 1950s, it follows a young Black man who sets off with his childhood friend and his uncle to search for his missing father. A series of connected stories follows these characters around and through the very real dangers of being Black in America, and not just in the Jim Crow South. But it also throws in some beasts and ghosts and bloody battles because after all, it's still horror.
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'Lovecraft Country' Tours The Horrors Of America

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'Lovecraft Country' Tours The Horrors Of America

'Lovecraft Country' Tours The Horrors Of America

'Lovecraft Country' Tours The Horrors Of America

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/904406116/905940705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

(L to R): Uncle George (Courtney B. Vance), Atticus (Jonathan Majors) and Letitia (Jurnee Smollett) in HBO's Lovecraft Country. Elizabeth Morris/HBO hide caption

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Elizabeth Morris/HBO

(L to R): Uncle George (Courtney B. Vance), Atticus (Jonathan Majors) and Letitia (Jurnee Smollett) in HBO's Lovecraft Country.

Elizabeth Morris/HBO

The best horror is the horror that feels true. That's one of the reasons the new HBO series Lovecraft Country works. The show is created by Misha Green, who also created the series Underground, and adapted from a novel by Matt Ruff. Set in the 1950s, it follows a young Black man (Jonathan Majors) who sets off with his childhood friend (Jurnee Smollett) and his uncle (Courtney B. Vance) to search for his missing father. A series of connected stories follows these characters around and through the very real dangers of being Black in America, and not just in the Jim Crow South. But it also throws in some beasts and ghosts and bloody battles because after all, it's still horror.

Show Notes:

The audio was produced and edited by Mike Katzif and Jessica Reedy.