Why taxes are a key part of representative government : The Indicator from Planet Money Taxes get a bad reputation, but they were central to the formation of representative government and even the written word.
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An Ode To Taxes

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An Ode To Taxes

An Ode To Taxes

An Ode To Taxes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/907184851/907197196" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Sean Gallup/Getty Images
DELPHI, GREECE - JULY 20: Visitors walk among the ruins of ancient Delphi on July 20, 2019 at Delphi, Greece. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Taxes have been around for thousands of years. Governments want your money! But the relationship between taxes and representative government is particularly interesting. Today, The Indicator takes a trip to Greece, and talks with financial historian William N. Goetzmann about the relationship between democracy and taxes.

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