A more inclusive economy makes for a more inventive economy : The Indicator from Planet Money Women and non-white men are gaining ground when it comes to science and engineering degrees, but not when it comes to patents.
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The Inclusion Payoff

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The Inclusion Payoff

The Inclusion Payoff

The Inclusion Payoff

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Owen Franken/Corbis
PARIS, FRANCE - JUNE 14: Students take part in the launch of the TeachHer, Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts & Design and Math (STEAM) Public Private Partnership (Photo by Owen Franken/Corbis via Getty Images)
Owen Franken/Corbis

Economist Lisa Cook, an old friend of the Indicator, is back with a new study that offers ideas for how to make the U.S. economy more innovative and more inventive — by first making it more inclusive.

"Since the 1960s," Cook writes, "both women and underrepresented minorities have earned an increasing share of bachelor's degrees and advanced degrees in fields most associated with invention—the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields. Yet, we do not observe a similar increase in patenting activity among these groups."

This underrepresentation in the innovation economy has contributed not just to racial and gender income gaps, but to stifling productivity growth for the whole economy.

On today's Indicator, Lisa Cook shares with us her three ideas for how to fix this innovation gap.

-- "Policies to broaden participation in the innovation process"

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