The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony : Alt.Latino The trio of powerful Latina vocalists is at home in mariachi, country, Americana and folk music.
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The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

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The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

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The Texicana Mamas (left to right): Tish Hinojosa, Stephanie Urbina Jones, Patricia Vonne. The trio's self-titled debut album is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Texicana Mamas (left to right): Tish Hinojosa, Stephanie Urbina Jones, Patricia Vonne. The trio's self-titled debut album is out now.

Courtesy of the artist

I've said this before: There is something that happens in Texas that really doesn't happen anywhere else. The mash-up of Mexican and Texan cultures manifests itself in food, fashion, attitude and music in a way that is distinct from the rest of Southwestern U.S.

This week's guests, the Texicana Mamas, are yet another example of that cultural hybrid. The trio not only spans genres — Americana, mariachi, country and folk — but also generations. Patricia Vonne and Stephanie Urbina Jones both released their first albums in the early 2000s while Tish Hinojosa has been at it since the late '80s. When they combine their experiences and voices, the result is a wondrous harmony saturated with musical authenticity.

Once you hear their stories, you'll understand why it seems as if the Texicana Mamas have been together for much longer than they have.