On This Colorado Farm, The Animals Love Listening To NPR Terry Tierney lives on a farm in Boulder, Colo., where he plays NPR for his animals. The pigs, chickens and horses are not only well informed but apparently NPR keeps the coyotes away.
NPR logo

On This Colorado Farm, The Animals Love Listening To NPR

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/910194906/910194907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
On This Colorado Farm, The Animals Love Listening To NPR

On This Colorado Farm, The Animals Love Listening To NPR

On This Colorado Farm, The Animals Love Listening To NPR

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/910194906/910194907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Terry Tierney lives on a farm in Boulder, Colo., where he plays NPR for his animals. The pigs, chickens and horses are not only well informed but apparently NPR keeps the coyotes away.

(SOUNDBITE OF PIG GRUNTING)

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

That's Telulah. She's an 8-year-old pot belly pig that lives on Terry Tierney's farm in Boulder, Colo.

TERRY TIERNEY: We have three horses. We have two goats. We have two pigs. We've got about 25 chickens. We've got some ducks, got a couple of dogs and a cat. And they're all rescue animals.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Telulah and her gang are a rowdy bunch, but one sound in particular gets them really excited.

TIERNEY: They can be loud all day long, but they tend to have a certain reaction when we get out there and put on NPR. Yes, they love it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Terry Tierney and his wife have been playing NPR for their animals for decades. They tried country music, but...

TIERNEY: They don't like the country music so much, unless, of course, it's the older stuff - Patsy Cline, Reba McEntire. But the music tends to get them a little agitated.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So with NPR, they're not only calm, but - we have to say it here - they're well-informed. But it serves another purpose for the animals, Tierney says.

TIERNEY: And we also have NPR on because the coyotes don't like it 'cause that sounds like there's people in the barn. And so they generally leave all our animals alone.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Hey, we understand coyotes may like Fox News better. But who is the loudest fan out of all the animals?

TIERNEY: It's the rooster, Ralston.

(SOUNDBITE OF ROOSTER CROWING)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I wonder if he plays The Puzzle.

Copyright © 2020 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.