These Gun Rights Activists Say NRA Is Weak On 2nd Amendment : No Compromise One of the same far-right groups behind this spring's anti-quarantine protests also plays a big role in a burgeoning "No Compromise" gun rights movement. Its members see the NRA as too amenable to gun control measures. Two reporters begin their journey to understand the Dorr Brothers and their followers.
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A World Where The NRA Is Soft On Guns

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A World Where The NRA Is Soft On Guns

A World Where The NRA Is Soft On Guns

A World Where The NRA Is Soft On Guns

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/910518992/910520700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Participants pose with a sign that reads 'come and take it' as the Virginia Gun Rally organized by the Virginia Citizens Defense League comes to an end outside the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond, Va. on Jan. 20. Thousands converged both to rally and to lobby lawmakers against proposed state gun restrictions. Maura Friedman for NPR hide caption

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Maura Friedman for NPR

Participants pose with a sign that reads 'come and take it' as the Virginia Gun Rally organized by the Virginia Citizens Defense League comes to an end outside the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond, Va. on Jan. 20. Thousands converged both to rally and to lobby lawmakers against proposed state gun restrictions.

Maura Friedman for NPR

Editor's note: A far-right group behind the anti-quarantine protests also plays a big role in a burgeoning gun rights movement. Its members see the NRA as too amenable to gun control.
Today,
NPR won a Pulitzer Prize for Audio Reporting for a deep dive into the "No Compromise" movement. The podcast is a co-production with member stations KCUR and WABE.
"The jury found the reporting in No Compromise courageous and tenacious, while at the same time fair and non-sensational," the Pulitzer judges said. "The series illuminates a deep and growing schism within the GOP that was largely unknown to the jurors - a schism coming into higher relief as the party struggles with its post-Trump legacy and future."
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About two months after the coronavirus began spreading in the United States, groups of Americans began to protest the quarantine lockdown measures in their states. It was an early preview of the politicization that has accompanied the pandemic in this country ever since.

At some of these anti-lockdown rallies — for instance in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Minnesota — reporters noticed might not be the spontaneous grassroots uprisings they purported to be. Rather, they were being organized by a group of three brothers: Aaron, Ben and Chris Dorr.

The trio made international news when reporters connected the "Re-open" protests with the Dorrs' primary business: pro-gun activism.

On Facebook, where the Dorr brothers' own audiences are largest, the brothers spun the coverage as a moment of triumph. In the world of online gun rights activism, being attacked by the "fake news media" is a badge of honor.

For local public radio reporters Lisa Hagen of WABE in Atlanta, Ga. and Chris Haxel of KCUR in Kansas City, Mo. the anti-lockdown protests were just the latest chapter of provocative Dorr family activities.

In January, the reporters followed the brothers to a massive and unprecedented pro-gun rally in Richmond, Va., where more than 20,000 gun owners protested gun regulations proposed by the Democrat-led state legislature.

The rally remained peaceful, but attracted militia groups and extremists of all kinds, including early examples of armed men in Hawaiian shirts now known as "Boogaloo Bois."

In the leadup to the event, several alleged white nationalists were arrested for plotting violence meant to spur a second civil war. It was an event even the National Rifle Association did not want to be associated with.

The rally's headliners instead hailed from an entirely different strain of pro-gun philosophy than the NRA, a more radical "No Compromise" movement that is gaining momentum in the gun world.

The reporters find the Dorr brothers broadcasting from the rally to Facebook followers all across the country. Hagen interviews the oldest brother, Aaron Dorr, who seems to be hiding something.