Review: Showgirls : Pop Culture Happy Hour In 1995, critics howled and self-appointed guardians of good taste were horrified at the release of Showgirls. Directed by Paul Verhoeven with a screenplay by Joe Eszterhas, the NC-17 film was a notorious flop at the time but is now considered a camp classic and a window into a moment of moral panic.
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Revisiting 'Showgirls', 25 Years Later

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Revisiting 'Showgirls', 25 Years Later

Revisiting 'Showgirls', 25 Years Later

Revisiting 'Showgirls', 25 Years Later

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911166648/951647293" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Elizabeth Berkley as Nomi, on the set of 1995's Showgirls. Murray Close/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Murray Close/Sygma via Getty Images

Elizabeth Berkley as Nomi, on the set of 1995's Showgirls.

Murray Close/Sygma via Getty Images

In 1995, critics howled and self-appointed guardians of good taste were horrified at the release of Showgirls. Directed by Paul Verhoeven with a screenplay by Joe Eszterhas, the NC-17 film was a notorious flop at the time but is now considered a camp classic and a window into a moment of moral panic.

The audio was produced by Mike Katzif and edited by Jessica Reedy.