How To Maximize Your Pandemic Lockdown Space : The Indicator from Planet Money Lockdowns, working from home, and remote learning have all made personal domestic space more scarce. Emily Anthes has some solutions.
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Making The Most Of Scarce Space

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Making The Most Of Scarce Space

Making The Most Of Scarce Space

Making The Most Of Scarce Space

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/911624033/911639188" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Sean Gallup/Getty Images
A potted plant stands on the window sill of a guestroom looking out onto a communist East Germany-era prefab apartment building.
Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Economics is partly the study of scarcity. With so many families now working, learning, dining and even playing at home, domestic space has become an increasingly scarce resource: there is quite literally less space in which we can work and see each other socially and just live our lives.

Emily Anthes is a science journalist who just published a new book called "The Great Indoors". It's about the science behind how we design our indoor spaces. On this episode of the Indicator, we talk to her about how we can get the most out of that increasingly scarce resource. And what lessons our expeditions to outer space have taught us.

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