The economics of the three-point shot : The Indicator from Planet Money The three-point shot has revolutionized basketball, but its unintended consequences could mean trouble for the sport's future.
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The Science of Hoops

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The Science of Hoops

The Science of Hoops

The Science of Hoops

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
LAKE BUENA VISTA, FLORIDA - AUGUST 30: Donovan Mitchell #45 of the Utah Jazz shoots a three point basket against Jerami Grant #9 of the Denver Nuggets during the fourth quarter in Game Six of the Western Conference First Round during the 2020 NBA Playoffs at AdventHealth Arena at ESPN Wide World Of Sports Complex on August 30, 2020. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

The playoffs for the National Basketball Association — the NBA — are in full swing right now. And for those listeners who haven't been watching, this year's games are a little different, thanks to COVID: All the teams are in Orlando playing in what they call "the bubble". It's a complex created for teams to compete in the middle of the pandemic.

And for listeners who have been watching, you might notice that players are shooting more three point shots than they used to. The three-pointer is the shot that changed the sport of basketball. So today on the show, in the last of our summer school Friday series, we are re-airing one of our favorite episodes that Stacey and I did last year. The economics of the three point shot: not only how it changed basketball, but also how the unintended consequences of that change could mean trouble for the future of the sport.

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