One Key To Reducing Black Infant Mortality? Black Doctors : Short Wave In the United States, Black infants die at over twice the rate of White infants. New research explores one key factor that may contribute to the disproportionately high rates of death among Black newborns: the race of their doctor. Reproductive health equity researcher Rachel Hardeman explains the findings.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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A Key To Black Infant Survival? Black Doctors

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A Key To Black Infant Survival? Black Doctors

A Key To Black Infant Survival? Black Doctors

A Key To Black Infant Survival? Black Doctors

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A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting. Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A recent study found that when a Black newborn was cared for by a Black physician, they were less likely to experience death in the hospital setting.

Jeff Adkins/ASSOCIATED PRESS

In the United States, Black infants die at over twice the rate of White infants. New research explores one key factor that may contribute to the disproportionately high rates of death among Black newborns: the race of their doctor. Reproductive health equity researcher Rachel Hardeman explains the findings.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brit Hanson, fact-checked by Ariela Zebede and edited by Viet Le.