Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Life, Her 'Most Fervent Wish' And The Future Of SCOTUS : 1A How are Republican senators handling accusations of hypocrisy? "There's nothing more shapeshifting than a senator considering judicial nominations. Consistency is not something we see very often," says reporter Robert Barnes.

"There are lots of Republicans who think, 'This is our chance to get a solid six-member conservative majority on the Supreme Court and we're gonna do it.'"

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Life, Her 'Most Fervent Wish' And The Future Of SCOTUS

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Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Life, Her 'Most Fervent Wish' And The Future Of SCOTUS

1A

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Life, Her 'Most Fervent Wish' And The Future Of SCOTUS

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Life, Her 'Most Fervent Wish' And The Future Of SCOTUS

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914465644/915350930" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away at the age of 87. Her death sets up another nomination to the Supreme Court — just weeks ahead of a presidential election. Mark Wilson/Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away at the age of 87. Her death sets up another nomination to the Supreme Court — just weeks ahead of a presidential election.

Mark Wilson/Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Twenty-seven years ago, then-Sen. Joe Biden gaveled together a special Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Decades before she was known as R.B.G., Ginsburg was the second woman to be nominated to the Supreme Court.

In her speech to the Senate Judiciary Committee, she called herself "a Brooklynite, born and bred" and invoked America's continual arc towards progress.

Ginsburg died on Friday at the age of 87 after a battle with pancreatic cancer. Her death has set off a monumental battle for her seat—and if all this has left you with some fundamental questions about the law, the Supreme Court and the integrity of our politics... well, you're not alone.

We sat with Leah Litman, Nina Totenberg, Anne Joseph O'Connell, and Robert Barnes to talk about Justice Ginsburg's life and legacy.

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