Block The Vote: Texas Voter ID Laws + Gerrymandering In Michigan : 1A We travel to Texas and Michigan to talk about two things that influence the way people vote and the power your ballot has: voter ID laws and gerrymandering.

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Block The Vote: Texas Voter ID Laws + Gerrymandering In Michigan

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Block The Vote: Texas Voter ID Laws + Gerrymandering In Michigan

1A

Block The Vote: Texas Voter ID Laws + Gerrymandering In Michigan

Block The Vote: Texas Voter ID Laws + Gerrymandering In Michigan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914466078/916609649" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A volunteer stands outside a polling station in Arlington, Virginia. Virginia is among the 34 states in the U.S. that require voters to show identification at the polls. AFP Contributor/ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

A volunteer stands outside a polling station in Arlington, Virginia. Virginia is among the 34 states in the U.S. that require voters to show identification at the polls.

AFP Contributor/ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

In over 30 states, you need to bring some sort of photo identification with you to the polls in order to vote. And last year, lawsuits in 19 states sought to redraw districting lines ahead of the 2020 election.

We took a look at what's happening in Texas, a state with some of the strictest voter ID laws in the nation. These measures have been debated in the legislature and in court for years. What does that mean for Lone Star voters in November? And why are voter suppression activists concerned?

We spoke with Ross Ramsey and Brittany Perry about it.

Then, we head to Michigan, where lawmakers are required to redraw district lines every ten years. In 2011, that meant the state's Republican majority was in charge. Critics say those redrawn districts helped them sweep the next midterm elections.

One of those critics is Katie Fahey. After the 2016 election, Katie wrote a Facebook post asking if anyone wanted to help her stop gerrymandering in Michigan. From there, Katie and a group of 10,000 volunteers mobilized to gather signatures and put together a ballot initiative that would create an independent committee of citizens to redraw district lines.

Katie Fahey joined us, along with Michigan Public Radio's Zoe Clark, to talk about gerrymandering and how it'll affect the 2020 election.

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