Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Death, Abortion And The 2020 Election : Consider This from NPR This week Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman in history to do so.

Ginsburg's death sparked record political donations from Democrats, explains Jessica Taylor of Cook Political Report. Those donations may help Democrats in an uphill battle to retake the Senate.

Meanwhile, Senate Republicans appear to have the numbers to fill Ginsburg's seat with a conservative nominee, which would shift the balance of power on the court. Professor Mary Ziegler of Florida State University explains why that could change the outcome of several cases concerning abortion restrictions that could land before the Supreme Court.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

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What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914511700/916250902" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Members of CASA, an advocacy organization for Latino and immigrant people, hold up white roses in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Carol Guzy for NPR hide caption

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Carol Guzy for NPR

Members of CASA, an advocacy organization for Latino and immigrant people, hold up white roses in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court on Wednesday.

Carol Guzy for NPR

This week Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol. She'll be the first woman in history to do so.

Ginsburg's death sparked record political donations from Democrats, explains Jessica Taylor of Cook Political Report. Those donations may help Democrats in an uphill battle to retake the Senate.

Meanwhile, Senate Republicans appear to have the numbers to fill Ginsburg's seat with a conservative nominee, which would shift the balance of power on the court. Professor Mary Ziegler of Florida State University explains why that could change the outcome of several cases concerning abortion restrictions that could land before the Supreme Court.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott, Lee Hale and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from Wynne Davis and Deirdre Walsh. Additional reporting from NPR's Danielle Kurtzleben. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.