Guy Raz of How I Built This on start-ups in a downturn : The Indicator from Planet Money Since the pandemic started, nearly 100,000 businesses have closed permanently. Opening a business now might seem crazy. But downturn start-ups have some advantages.
NPR logo

Downturn Start-Ups: A Conversation With Guy Raz

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914525668/914547387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Downturn Start-Ups: A Conversation With Guy Raz

Downturn Start-Ups: A Conversation With Guy Raz

Downturn Start-Ups: A Conversation With Guy Raz

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/914525668/914547387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Andrew Lipovsky/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images
Guy Raz on the Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon in January 2020
Andrew Lipovsky/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Since March, nearly 100,000 businesses have shut their doors permanently.

The downturn in the economy has forced entrepreneurs and business owners in all industries to innovate, adapt, and maximize their resources.

Today on the show, Stacey talks to Guy Raz, of How I Built This, about his new book about resilience, the hero's journey of entrepreneurship, and why now might actually be a good time to start something new.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.