The Bank of Jamaica uses reggae to explain monetary policy : The Indicator from Planet Money Jamaica's Central Bank has a unique way of explaining its policies: Reggae music videos. The Indicator talks with the Central Bank about why they've taken this unique approach.
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Jamaican Monetary Policy: Behind The Music

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Jamaican Monetary Policy: Behind The Music

Jamaican Monetary Policy: Behind The Music

Jamaican Monetary Policy: Behind The Music

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/915411409/915459239" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Robin Chin and Donovan Watkis/Bank of Jamaica
Bank of Jamaica's music video about inflation featuring Denyque.
Robin Chin and Donovan Watkis/Bank of Jamaica

In 1992, Jamaica's inflation rate peaked at over 70%.

Since then, the country has managed to gain better control of inflation and, in 2017, the Bank of Jamaica set an annual inflation target of between 4% and 6%.

Now, Jamaica's inflation rate is around 5%.

And the Central Bank has chosen a unique way to communicate these policies to its citizens: Reggae music videos.

Today on the show, Stacey talks to Wayne Robinson, Senior Deputy Governor at the Bank of Jamaica about the campaign and why making monetary policy accessible is important.

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