Indianapolis Colts Linebacker Accidently Gives Away His Wedding Ring Darius Leonard gave his gloves to a lucky fan at Lucas Oil Stadium after Sunday's game. The fan posted on Twitter about the wedding ring being inside a glove. Leonard replied, "I need that."
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Indianapolis Colts Linebacker Accidently Gives Away His Wedding Ring

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Indianapolis Colts Linebacker Accidently Gives Away His Wedding Ring

Indianapolis Colts Linebacker Accidently Gives Away His Wedding Ring

Indianapolis Colts Linebacker Accidently Gives Away His Wedding Ring

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/915555293/915555294" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Darius Leonard gave his gloves to a lucky fan at Lucas Oil Stadium after Sunday's game. The fan posted on Twitter about the wedding ring being inside a glove. Leonard replied, "I need that."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with news of a personal foul. Football player Darius Leonard gave away his wedding ring Sunday. It was an accident. The Indianapolis Colts linebacker gave his gloves to a lucky fan at Lucas Oil Stadium. Then the fan realized the ring was inside. Social media, blamed for making so many problems worse, this time was a force for good. The fan posted about Leonard's mistake, and Leonard replied, I need that. It's MORNING EDITION.

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