Springsteen Credits Fan's Gift For The Existence Of His New Album Needing inspiration, Bruce Springsteen says he wandered through his house playing a guitar that a fan gave him. He tells Rolling Stone he wrote the songs for his new album on it in less than 10 days.
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Springsteen Credits Fan's Gift For The Existence Of His New Album

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Springsteen Credits Fan's Gift For The Existence Of His New Album

Springsteen Credits Fan's Gift For The Existence Of His New Album

Springsteen Credits Fan's Gift For The Existence Of His New Album

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  • Transcript

Needing inspiration, Bruce Springsteen says he wandered through his house playing a guitar that a fan gave him. He tells Rolling Stone he wrote the songs for his new album on it in less than 10 days.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Bruce Springsteen says his new album might not have existed except for a fan.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LETTER TO YOU")

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) ...My letter to you.

INSKEEP: The singer-songwriter says he needed inspiration, and then he wandered through his house playing a guitar that a fan had presented him outside a show. He tells Rolling Stone he wrote all the songs for his new album on that guitar in less than 10 days. He says, as an artist, he is at the mercy of events. It's MORNING EDITION.

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