Chemical Plants At Risk From Stronger, Frequent Hurricanes : Short Wave Fueled by climate change, hurricanes are becoming stronger and more frequent. Those storms have repeatedly led to spills and fires at chemical manufacturing plants along the Gulf Coast.

But can companies — and the people who work for them — be held responsible or even sent to prison for failing to adequately prepare for climate change?

NPR's Rebecca Hersher reported on that question, which is at the center of a recent lawsuit.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.
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Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

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Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

Fueled By Climate Change, Hurricanes Are Causing Industrial Accidents. Who's Liable?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/916862969/917899569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Smoke rises from a burning chemical plant after the passing of Hurricane Laura in Lake Charles, Louisiana on August 27. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Smoke rises from a burning chemical plant after the passing of Hurricane Laura in Lake Charles, Louisiana on August 27.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Fueled by climate change, hurricanes are becoming stronger and more frequent. Those storms have repeatedly led to spills and fires at chemical manufacturing plants along the Gulf Coast.

But can companies — and the people who work for them — be held responsible or even sent to prison for failing to adequately prepare for climate change?

NPR's Rebecca Hersher reported on that question, which is at the center of a recent lawsuit.

Email the show at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode update was produced by Brent Baughman, edited by Geoff Brumfiel, and fact-checked by Ariela Zebede. The original episode was edited by Viet Le and fact-checked by Maddie Sofia.