African Grey Parrots Removed From Public Earshot After Salty Language During quarantine, the birds in a U.K. wildlife park started exchanging curse words. Handlers say the foul fowls began hurling insults. Laughing just encouraged them.

African Grey Parrots Removed From Public Earshot After Salty Language

African Grey Parrots Removed From Public Earshot After Salty Language

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During quarantine, the birds in a U.K. wildlife park started exchanging curse words. Handlers say the foul fowls began hurling insults. Laughing just encouraged them.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. African grey parrots are famous for their ability to pick up human speech. But five parrots at a wildlife park in Lincolnshire in the U.K. were a bit too keen. During quarantine, the birds started exchanging curse words, and now all of them talk more like sailors than parrots. Handlers say the foul fowls began hurling insults. Laughter just encouraged them. For now, the squad of salty birds have been separated and taken out of public earshot. It's MORNING EDITION.

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