How the super rich and dark money influence politics : The Indicator from Planet Money The Center for Public Integrity joins The Indicator with an excerpt from The Heist, a new podcast exploring money and politics in the Trump Administration.
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Big Donors & Pay-To-Play Politics

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Big Donors & Pay-To-Play Politics

Big Donors & Pay-To-Play Politics

Big Donors & Pay-To-Play Politics

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/918871445/918907425" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Courtesy of Doug Deason
Doug and Darwin Deason pose with President Donald Trump
Courtesy of Doug Deason

We all know people with lots of money can gain special political access, but we don't typically get an up-close look. Today, The Indicator explores the world of big donors and the millions they give openly as well as behind the scenes through dark money. Dark money is a largely unregulated channel of shadowy non-profit organizations that can spend unlimited amounts on political ads, and has enormous influence over the policies and laws that get enacted in this country.

Today on the show, The Center for Public Integrity shares an excerpt from its new podcast, The Heist, which talks to one rich donor about how the system works.

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