The Struggle For Working Mothers During The Pandemic : 1A Women workers have been hit particularly hard by the pandemic. "In March, the unemployment rate for women was about 4%, and now it's hovering around 14%...for Black women it's about 15% and for Latina women it's about the same," researcher Nicole Mason says.

But she adds that problems for women workers go back further than COVID-19. "The system is broken and it has been for some time."

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The Struggle For Working Mothers During The Pandemic

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The Struggle For Working Mothers During The Pandemic

1A

The Struggle For Working Mothers During The Pandemic

The Struggle For Working Mothers During The Pandemic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/919384597/919667717" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The pandemic induced a unique, immediate juggling act for working mothers of school-age children. OLI SCARFF/Oli Scarff / Getty Images hide caption

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OLI SCARFF/Oli Scarff / Getty Images

The pandemic induced a unique, immediate juggling act for working mothers of school-age children.

OLI SCARFF/Oli Scarff / Getty Images

Ruth Bader Ginsburg dedicated her career to the fight for gender equality even before her time on the Supreme Court. Early in her career, she challenged laws that discriminated on the basis of sex.

As a Supreme Court justice, she wrote the opinion striking down the men-only admissions policy of the Virginia Military Academy. Her dissent in a case involving pay discrimination in the workplace led to the enactment of Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.

But wage discrimination is deeply rooted in our legal system.

And the COVID-19 pandemic has only highlighted just how much work we still need to do. Some women fear the pandemic is pushing them back into traditional roles and further behind in careers they've spent years building.

1A National Correspondent Sasha-Ann Simons spoke with some mothers about their recent experience juggling work and family.

Then, we spoke with Nicole Mason and Dr. Kali Cyrus about how the deteriorating conditions for already-struggling working women during the pandemic and what we might expect to happen in the near future.

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