Millions are unemployed, but some companies can't fill jobs : The Indicator from Planet Money The U.S. is experiencing the worst unemployment crisis since the Great Depression. Meanwhile, some employers claim that they can't find the workers they need. What's going on?
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Jobs Friday: The Worker Shortage Mystery

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Jobs Friday: The Worker Shortage Mystery

Jobs Friday: The Worker Shortage Mystery

Jobs Friday: The Worker Shortage Mystery

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/919720917/919755234" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Marco Bello/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A "Now Hiring" sign is displayed during a job fair for Hispanic professionals in Miami, Florida.
Marco Bello/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It's Jobs Friday, and the latest jobs report shows the U.S. remains firmly in the middle of the worst unemployment crisis since the Great Depression. The coronavirus pandemic has put millions of Americans out of work and in grave financial distress.

At the same time, some employers claim that there's a worker shortage. From construction to health care, a number of industries maintain that they can't find people to fill jobs. The result is a paradox across the country: Employers desperate to hire, employees desperate for work.

On today's show, we take a look at the American workforce, and explain why employers and employees are so misaligned in the current economic climate.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

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