Michigan Kidnapping Plot Latest Case Of Right-Wing Extremism : Consider This from NPR The FBI announced Thursday that it had thwarted a plan by far-right militia members to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and charged six men in relation to the plot.

The plot began as talk on social media sites, with a group of men gathering on Facebook to share anti-government reaction to Whitmer's coronavirus restrictions and shutdowns.

Experts say the pandemic, protests, and the words of the president have combined to fuel a rise in right-wing extremism. Cynthia Miller-Idriss, a professor at American University who tracks right-wing extremism, spoke to NPR about how right-wing recruiters are taking advantage of President Trump's hesitancy to condemn white supremacy and militia groups.

And while these men have been referred to as members of a "militia," that term has also resurfaced a debate about whether groups like this should actually be referred to as domestic terrorist groups, says Kathleen Belew, an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago who studies paramilitary and white power groups.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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The Michigan Kidnapping Plot And What's Fueling Right-Wing Extremism

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The Michigan Kidnapping Plot And What's Fueling Right-Wing Extremism

The Michigan Kidnapping Plot And What's Fueling Right-Wing Extremism

The Michigan Kidnapping Plot And What's Fueling Right-Wing Extremism

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/920314527/922403069" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addressed the state on Thursday after the Michigan attorney general, Michigan State Police, U.S. Department of Justice, and FBI announced state and federal charges against 13 members of two militia groups who were preparing to kidnap and possibly kill the governor. AP hide caption

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Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addressed the state on Thursday after the Michigan attorney general, Michigan State Police, U.S. Department of Justice, and FBI announced state and federal charges against 13 members of two militia groups who were preparing to kidnap and possibly kill the governor.

AP

The FBI announced Thursday that it had thwarted a plan by far-right militia members to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and charged six men in relation to the plot.

The plot began as talk on social media sites, with a group of men gathering on Facebook to share anti-government reaction to Whitmer's coronavirus restrictions and shutdowns.

Experts say the pandemic, protests, and the words of the president have combined to fuel a rise in right-wing extremism. Cynthia Miller-Idriss, a professor at American University who tracks right-wing extremism, spoke to NPR about how right-wing recruiters are taking advantage of President Trump's hesitancy to condemn white supremacy and militia groups.

And while these men have been referred to as members of a "militia," that term has also resurfaced a debate about whether groups like this should actually be referred to as domestic terrorist groups, says Kathleen Belew, an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago who studies paramilitary and white power groups.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Becky Sullivan, Brianna Scott, and Lee Hale. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from Wynne Davis, Andrew Sussman, and Acacia Squires. Additional reporting from Hannah Allam. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.