Barbados hopes a new visa will attract remote workers : The Indicator from Planet Money The Barbados economy depends on tourism, so travel restrictions have been devastating. But the island nation has come up with an innovative stopgap: A visa that lets visitors work remotely from Barbados for a year.
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WFH From Barbados

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WFH From Barbados

WFH From Barbados

WFH From Barbados

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Gregory N. Juday/U.S. Navy
Taking the plunge in Bridgetown, Barbados
Gregory N. Juday/U.S. Navy

The next stage of working remotely — very remotely — starts with a Caribbean island with a problem, and an opportunity. (Here at The Indicator we call this a problemtunity.)

The problem: The coronavirus pandemic has hurt countries like Barbados that rely on tourism for their economy. International tourists globally were down 65% in the first half of the year.

The problemtunity: With so many people discovering they could work remotely, Barbados announced the Welcome Stamp, a visa that allows people to work for their employer back home while living — and spending — in Barbados for a year.

We talk with some of the people on the sandy frontiers of a huge experiment in how more of us could work and travel in the future.

Music from Visit Barbados. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

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