David Crosby Reflects on Musical Projects, Past And Present : World Cafe : World Cafe Words and Music from WXPN The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer is a counterculture icon. Listen to a wide-ranging interview on World Cafe.
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David Crosby On World Cafe

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David Crosby Reflects On Musical Projects, Past And Present

David Crosby Reflects On Musical Projects, Past And Present

David Crosby On World Cafe

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Musician David Crosby visits the 'Occupy Wall Street' at Zuccotti Park in the Financial District near Wall Street on Nov. 4, 2011, in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Musician David Crosby visits the 'Occupy Wall Street' at Zuccotti Park in the Financial District near Wall Street on Nov. 4, 2011, in New York City.

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Near the beginning of the recent Cameron Crowe documentary, David Crosby: Remember My Name, there's a black and white clip of a 1966 interview with The Beatles. And in the background, just off to the side of the stage, there's a young, clean-shaven, mop-topped David Crosby peeking in, watching with a huge grin on his face. It's a quick moment, but it captures something about Crosby that I think has been a theme throughout his long life and career: Not only has he always seemed to want to be a part of the action – he almost always has been.

In this session, the Croz joins me to talk about that documentary, and to talk about musical projects past and present, including his recent work with his Lighthouse bandmates Becca Stevens, Michelle Willis and Michael League. Oh, and he'll also tell us what he really thinks of Jim Morrison and The Doors.

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