The Challenge Of School Discipline During The Pandemic : 1A Danielle Elliott says it's a lot more difficult for teachers to engage with special needs students remotely. "My son does struggle with ADHD," she says. "I would think it'd almost be easier when my child gets distracted to just hit the mute button [...] and disable the camera."

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The Challenge Of School Discipline During The Pandemic

The Challenge Of School Discipline During The Pandemic

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A hallway and billboard remain empty at Yung Wing School P.S. 124 in New York City. Michael Loccisano/Michael Loccisano/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

A hallway and billboard remain empty at Yung Wing School P.S. 124 in New York City.

Michael Loccisano/Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

This past spring, students, teachers and parents were all thrown into the world of virtual learning.

A new world means new rules. And schools across the country have been cracking down on rule-breakers, in both in-person and virtual classrooms.

Education advocates warn that suspending students during a pandemic will widen an already-large achievement gap, especially for those with learning differences.

How do you keep students safe and keep order while leaving room for compromise?

Danielle Elliott, Carolle O'Neil, and Carolle's son, Luke, talked with us about their experiences dealing with virtual learning.

Then, reporter Rachel Silberstein and principal Ricki Gibbs joined us to talk about what schools across the country are reconsidering regarding student discipline.

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