How bars fuel innovation and economic growth : The Indicator from Planet Money There's a long history of bars playing a vital role in innovation and economic growth. What happens when they all close down?
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An Economist Walks Into A Bar

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An Economist Walks Into A Bar

An Economist Walks Into A Bar

An Economist Walks Into A Bar

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/923123253/923135069" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images
A bartender wearing a facemask makes drinks as Fish Tails bar and grill opens for in person dining, amid the coronavirus pandemic- (Photo by Alex Edelman / AFP) (Photo by ALEX EDELMAN/AFP via Getty Images)
Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Some of the world's most groundbreaking ideas were generated over drinks: Apple computers, Southwest Airlines, Buffalo wings, existentialism.

A few years ago, economics professor Mike Andrews decided to take a closer look at the link between bars and innovation by looking at patent filings during the Prohibition era. What he found was striking.

Alex Mayyasi from Gastro Obscura joins the show to talk bars, Zoom happy hours, and the future of innovation.

You can find Mike Andrew's here and Alex's article here.

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