Cosmonauts Read Tea Leaves To Find Air Leak Source When an air leak got worse on the International Space Station, Russian cosmonauts broke open a tea bag to let the leaves float up to identify the source of the leak.
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Cosmonauts Read Tea Leaves To Find Air Leak Source

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Cosmonauts Read Tea Leaves To Find Air Leak Source

Cosmonauts Read Tea Leaves To Find Air Leak Source

Cosmonauts Read Tea Leaves To Find Air Leak Source

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/926051675/926081405" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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When an air leak got worse on the International Space Station, Russian cosmonauts broke open a tea bag to let the leaves float up to identify the source of the leak.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. When you think of the International Space Station, you probably think it's super high tech, right? But when an air leak got worse recently, Russian cosmonauts came up with a not-so-high-tech solution. They broke open a tea bag and let the leaves float up to identify the source of the leak. It's like using dish soap to find the source of a leak in a plastic pool - except this is the International Space Station we're talking about. It's MORNING EDITION.

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