What To Expect On Election Day And The Days After : Consider This from NPR There is no reason to expect we will know the result of the Presidential election on Tuesday night. Wendy Weiser of the Brennan Center and David Scott, deputy managing editor with the Associated Press, explain why.

Part of the reason: a few key states will have millions of mail-in ballots to count after in-person voting has concluded. The Supreme Court ruled this week to allow that counting to proceed in two key states, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Election lawyer Ben Ginsberg has been following those cases.

NPR's Joel Rose reports watchdog groups who normally monitor elections abroad for violence and unrest are turning their sights toward the U.S.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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What To Expect On Election Day — And In The Days After

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What To Expect On Election Day — And In The Days After

What To Expect On Election Day — And In The Days After

What To Expect On Election Day — And In The Days After

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/927320846/929638495" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Voters cast their early ballots for the 2020 Presidential election at Madison Square Garden on October 30 in New York City. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Voters cast their early ballots for the 2020 Presidential election at Madison Square Garden on October 30 in New York City.

Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

There is no reason to expect we will know the result of the Presidential election on Tuesday night. Wendy Weiser of the Brennan Center and David Scott, deputy managing editor with the Associated Press, explain why.

Part of the reason: a few key states will have millions of mail-in ballots to count after in-person voting has concluded. The Supreme Court ruled this week to allow that counting to proceed in two key states, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Election lawyer Ben Ginsberg has been following those cases.

NPR's Joel Rose reports watchdog groups who normally monitor elections abroad for violence and unrest are turning their sights toward the U.S.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Brianna Scott, Lee Hale, and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Sami Yenigun with help from Wynne Davis, Arnie Seipel, and Brett Neeley. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.