Interview: Wayne Coyne On Drugs And The Flaming Lips' New Album, 'American Head' : All Songs Considered All Songs Considered's Bob Boilen talks with The Flaming Lips frontman about drugs, the tragic loss of friends, the impact on families and how it all informs the band's latest album, American Head.
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Wayne Coyne On Drugs And The Flaming Lips' 'American Head'

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Wayne Coyne On Drugs And The Flaming Lips' 'American Head'

Wayne Coyne On Drugs And The Flaming Lips' 'American Head'

Wayne Coyne On Drugs And The Flaming Lips' 'American Head'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/927922115/927931844" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

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George Salisbury/Courtesy of the artist

The Flaming Lips

George Salisbury/Courtesy of the artist

On this edition of All Songs Considered, I have a conversation with Wayne Coyne of The Flaming Lips, and the subject is drugs. It's the centerpiece of their new and 16th studio album, American Head. The songs, written by Wayne Coyne, Steven Drozd and the band, weave both real-life experiences with fiction, often depicting the sadness and tragedy of drug use.

In this conversation, Wayne Coyne speaks to the tragic loss of friends, the impact on families and how the contemplative and thrilling sounds of this record came to be. It all began with an unlikely inspiration: the death of musician Tom Petty.


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