The DAWN Bill asks for $44 billion to support arts & culture : The Indicator from Planet Money As arts workers continue to struggle, they're trying their hand at something new. Not a new performance or show, but a piece of legislation which would keep their industry alive through the pandemic.
NPR logo

A New DAWN On Broadway

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/927996416/927996491" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
A New DAWN On Broadway

A New DAWN On Broadway

A New DAWN On Broadway

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/927996416/927996491" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Sally Herships
Performers in Times Square supporting the DAWN Bill
Sally Herships

In March, Congress passed a historic $2 trillion economic relief package to help the country respond to the devastating economic impacts of the coronavirus.

But some of that money has run out. And one industry in particular says if it's going to survive the pandemic, it will need more financial help from the federal government: The arts and culture industry.

According to the Department of Commerce, the arts and culture sector — that's everything from Broadway shows, to zoos and Hollywood studios — is responsible for 4.5% of the United States' GDP and over 5 million jobs.

Now performers, artists and artisans are banding together to try to save their industry. Not with a song, a show or paintings but with legislation. Their proposal, the DAWN Bill, would supply the arts and culture industry with $44 billion in federal relief funds.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.