More Than 100 Fans Attend Bob Ross Experience In Indiana For years on his PBS program, Bob Ross taught legions of wanna-be artists how to paint. This weekend fans toured his studio, attended a painting workshop and dressed up as Ross for a costume contest.
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More Than 100 Fans Attend Bob Ross Experience In Indiana

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More Than 100 Fans Attend Bob Ross Experience In Indiana

More Than 100 Fans Attend Bob Ross Experience In Indiana

More Than 100 Fans Attend Bob Ross Experience In Indiana

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For years on his PBS program, Bob Ross taught legions of wanna-be artists how to paint. This weekend fans toured his studio, attended a painting workshop and dressed up as Ross for a costume contest.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. Throughout the 1980s and '90s, the late Bob Ross taught legions of wannabe artists how to paint happy little clouds and other landscapes through his PBS program. This past weekend, fans went to the first "Bob Ross Experience." They toured his studio, attended a painting workshop and even dressed up as Ross for a costume contest. According to The New York Times, they could even check out the hair pick Ross kept in his back pocket to fluff out his perm. It's MORNING EDITION.

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