How Elvis Presley helped market a vaccine : The Indicator from Planet Money Development of a coronavirus continues apace. But as many as two-thirds of Americans say they likely won't take it. Which means a successful vaccine will need an effective marketing campaign.
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What Elvis Can Teach Us About Vaccine Marketing

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What Elvis Can Teach Us About Vaccine Marketing

What Elvis Can Teach Us About Vaccine Marketing

What Elvis Can Teach Us About Vaccine Marketing

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/930923756/931442151" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
New York Daily News Archive/NY Daily News via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 28: Elvis Presley receiving a polio vaccination from Dr. Leona Baumgartner and Dr. Harold Fuerst at CBS studio 50 in New York City. (Photo by Seymour Wally/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
New York Daily News Archive/NY Daily News via Getty Images

As the coronavirus continues to spread, scientists are racing to create a vaccine. But vaccine creation is only one part of the immunization process. When or if a COVID-19 vaccine is available, public health officials will likely face an entirely different challenge.

Polling has shown that anywhere from about half to two-thirds of Americans say they are unlikely to take a coronavirus vaccine. So how do governments and health institutions market a product they really need Americans to buy?

On today's show, the story of how Elvis Presley helped market the vaccine for polio to a skeptical public, and what lessons we can draw from that campaign to help in the fight against the coronavirus.

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