Raj Chetty's Opportunity Insights wants to fight recessions with new tools, data : Planet Money A research group at Harvard came up with a faster way to check the economy's pulse. It may change how we fight recessions. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.
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What's Next for the Economy?

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What's Next for the Economy?

What's Next for the Economy?

What's Next for the Economy?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/931496888/931511082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Ed Lefkowicz/VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Brooklyn, NY - 26 March 2020. Residents of New York City have been asked to stay home as a result of the novel coronavirus, and all but essential businesses have been asked to close. A sign on a closed laundromat on Avenue J.
Ed Lefkowicz/VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

No matter who gets voted into office, the next Congress and the next president will have to design a plan to help the economy. They'll have to figure out who to send money to, exactly how much — and they'll have to do it stat.

But figuring out exactly where we are in the economy is hard, especially when numbers like gross domestic product and unemployment rate take months to update. So a group at Harvard University decided to reinvent how we measure the economy.

Today on the show: We learn about the economists behind Opportunity Insights, the new research and policy institution.

Music: "Buddy the Grub", "Comings and Goings" and "Diamond Dog."

Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Instagram / TikTok

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, Pocket Casts and NPR One.

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