Prop 22 Passed. What's Ahead For Gig Workers Nationwide? : 1A After Prop 22 passed in California, organizers and tech companies expect the fight over whether gig economy workers should be classified as employees or independent contractors to go national.

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Prop 22 Passed. What's Ahead For Gig Workers Nationwide?

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Prop 22 Passed. What's Ahead For Gig Workers Nationwide?

1A

Prop 22 Passed. What's Ahead For Gig Workers Nationwide?

Prop 22 Passed. What's Ahead For Gig Workers Nationwide?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933057449/934213141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

App-based drivers from Uber and Lyft protest against Prop 22 in a caravan in front of City Hall in Los Angeles. The ballot measure was approved by voters and will classify app-based drivers as independent contractors instead of employees. FREDERIC J. BROWN/FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

App-based drivers from Uber and Lyft protest against Prop 22 in a caravan in front of City Hall in Los Angeles. The ballot measure was approved by voters and will classify app-based drivers as independent contractors instead of employees.

FREDERIC J. BROWN/FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

The presidential race has gotten a lot of airtime. But in California, voters passed a ballot measure that could also have some sweeping ramifications.

Proposition 22 exempts gig-based app companies like Uber, Lyft, and Door-Dash from classifying their workers as employees. Now, they'll remain independent contractors. That means these workers are ineligible for many employee protections and benefits.

Tech companies and other Prop 22 advocates say this classification will maintain worker flexibility. For its opponents, this spells a dangerous turn for labor rights in the gig economy.

Edward Ongweso Jr., law professor David Levine, and Jan Kreuger, a Lyft driver talked with us about Prop 22.

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