Polling Your Leg? The Pitfalls Of Predicting An Election : 1A Feeling like you can't trust the polls again?

We talked about the perks and perils of political polling with The Marist Institute for Public Opinion's Lee Miringoff, HuffPo's Ariel Edwards-Levy and Gallup's Mohamed Younis.

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Polling Your Leg? The Pitfalls Of Predicting An Election

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Polling Your Leg? The Pitfalls Of Predicting An Election

1A

Polling Your Leg? The Pitfalls Of Predicting An Election

Polling Your Leg? The Pitfalls Of Predicting An Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/935261940/936282677" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Empty voting booths are seen in Flint, Michigan at the Berston Fieldhouse polling place. SETH HERALD/SETH HERALD/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SETH HERALD/SETH HERALD/AFP via Getty Images

Empty voting booths are seen in Flint, Michigan at the Berston Fieldhouse polling place.

SETH HERALD/SETH HERALD/AFP via Getty Images

The presidential races of 2016 and 2020 have led to different outcomes: red, blue. President Donald Trump won then. Joe Biden is now the president-elect.

But the public's deepening distrust in election polling is part of what unites the two election cycles.

We explored whether election polls are still valuable...and if they aren't, what the alternative could be with three experts: Lee Miringoff, Ariel Edwards-Levy and Mohamed Younis.

Find our conversation about polls from after the 2016 election on our website.