From Transport To Storage, How Vaccine Distribution Will Work : Consider This from NPR Distribution of the first doses of a coronavirus vaccine could be mere months away. But how that distribution will work remains a massive logistical puzzle that is still coming together piece by piece.

NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on how drug companies and the federal government are planning to ship and store vaccines that must remain frozen, some at temperatures that require special freezers.

NPR's Dina Temple-Raston outlines the federal government's $590 million plan to avoid shortages of crucial vials and syringes.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.
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Vials, Cold Storage, Staggered Doses: The Challenges Of Vaccine Distribution

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Vials, Cold Storage, Staggered Doses: The Challenges Of Vaccine Distribution

Vials, Cold Storage, Staggered Doses: The Challenges Of Vaccine Distribution

Vials, Cold Storage, Staggered Doses: The Challenges Of Vaccine Distribution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/935465525/936821077" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine needs to be stored at minus 70 Celsius. Health care providers will need to store it either in dry ice for shorter stints or in specialized freezers. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine needs to be stored at minus 70 Celsius. Health care providers will need to store it either in dry ice for shorter stints or in specialized freezers.

Leon Neal/Getty Images

Distribution of the first doses of a coronavirus vaccine could be mere months away. But how that distribution will work remains a massive logistical puzzle that is still coming together piece by piece.

NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports on how drug companies and the federal government are planning to ship and store vaccines that must remain frozen, some at temperatures that require special freezers.

NPR's Dina Temple-Raston outlines the federal government's $590 million plan to avoid shortages of crucial vials and syringes.

In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Email us at considerthis@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Lee Hale, Brianna Scott, and Brent Baughman. It was edited by Lee Hale with help from Wynne Davis and Scott Hensley. Additional reporting from Selena Simmons-Duffin. Our executive producer is Cara Tallo.