Trump Doesn't Have To Win In Court To Erode Trust In Voting : The NPR Politics Podcast President Trump has found little success in court, though he has continued to sew disinformation online and last night fired a top cybersecurity official who had worked to bolster public confidence in the electoral system.

This episode: correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and voting reporter Miles Parks.

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Trump Doesn't Have To Win In Court To Erode Trust In Voting

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Trump Doesn't Have To Win In Court To Erode Trust In Voting

Trump Doesn't Have To Win In Court To Erode Trust In Voting

Trump Doesn't Have To Win In Court To Erode Trust In Voting

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/936331666/936378398" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable at the State Dining Room of the White House June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable at the State Dining Room of the White House June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Donald Trump lost the election to Joe Biden — a reality that the president continues to deny online, lashing out at those who say otherwise.

On Tuesday night, Chris Krebs, a top cybersecurity official, was fired by presidential tweet after his agency released a statement calling the 2020 election "the most secure in American history."

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican, told NPR this week that the president's allies, including Sen. Lindsey Graham, have tried to pressure him into throwing out legally cast votes. Graham denies the claim.

And Republican officials in Michigan's most populous county briefly refused to certify election results Tuesday, earning praise from the president. The Wayne County officials reversed course shortly thereafter, certifying the results after a sharp public outcry.

Most Republican leaders, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have stopped short of endorsing the president's fraud claims, while insisting that the president can and should exhaust his options in court. Those legal challenges, though, have done almost nothing to advance the president's cause.

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Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.
Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.
Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.
Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.
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