Explaining The Science Behind An mRNA Vaccine For COVID-19 : 1A Scientists have dreamed about the possibilities of custom-made messenger RNA (mRNA). mRNA technology is now driving the latest vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna. How do mRNA vaccines work? And we'll go back to high school biology to remind you what mRNA is, and what it does.

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Explaining The Science Behind An mRNA Vaccine For COVID-19

Explaining The Science Behind An mRNA Vaccine For COVID-19

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Pfizer is among the leading companies who claim their mRNA vaccine is more than 90 percent effective against coronavirus. KENA BETANCUR/KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KENA BETANCUR/KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images

Pfizer is among the leading companies who claim their mRNA vaccine is more than 90 percent effective against coronavirus.

KENA BETANCUR/KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images

With coronavirus surging worldwide, scientists are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine.

Pharmaceutical companies Pfizer, Moderna, and AstraZeneca all have candidates that look promising. But these vaccines aren't your normal flu shot. They use mRNA, and its use represents one of the latest advances on the cutting edge of biotechnology.

But what is mRNA, exactly?

Virologist Angela Rasmussen, professor and Pfizer trial participant Walter Isaacson and the International Rescue Committee's David Miliband talked us through what we know about these vaccines and the questions you had about it.

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