The Case To Go Back To Venus : Short Wave In 1962, the first spacecraft humans ever sent to another planet — Mariner 2 — went to Venus. The first planet on which humans ever landed a probe — also Venus! But since then, Mars has been the focus of planetary missions. NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel makes the case for why humans should reconsider visiting to Venus.

For more science reporting and stories, follow Geoff on twitter @gbrumfiel. And, as always, email us at shortwave@npr.org.
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Let's Go Back To Venus!

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Let's Go Back To Venus!

Let's Go Back To Venus!

Let's Go Back To Venus!

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Albert Klein/Getty Images
Venus from space
Albert Klein/Getty Images

In 1962, the first spacecraft humans ever sent to another planet — Mariner 2 — went to Venus. The first planet on which humans ever landed a probe — also Venus! But since then, Mars has been the focus of planetary missions. NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel makes the case for why humans should reconsider visiting to Venus.

For more science reporting and stories, follow Geoff Brumfiel on Twitter @gbrumfiel. And, as always, e-mail us at shortwave@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Thomas Lu, edited by Gisele Grayson, and fact-checked by Ariela Zebede.