Fish Market Cook Finds Giant Pearl While Preparing Chowder A fish market employee in Montauk, Long Island, finds a rare treasure while preparing the day's pot of clam chowder: A giant pearl.
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Fish Market Cook Finds Giant Pearl While Preparing Chowder

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Fish Market Cook Finds Giant Pearl While Preparing Chowder

Fish Market Cook Finds Giant Pearl While Preparing Chowder

Fish Market Cook Finds Giant Pearl While Preparing Chowder

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/939629376/939629377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A fish market employee in Montauk, Long Island, finds a rare treasure while preparing the day's pot of clam chowder: A giant pearl.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You never know where a pearl may turn up in life. A pearl the size of a gumball recently showed up at Gosman's Fish Market in Montauk, Long Island. Bryan Gosman, co-owner of the fish market, says his staff was making New England chowder, which includes clams, in their kitchen when a scrupulously honest employee discovered the pearl that's approximately 20 millimeters in diameter.

This looked like a plastic knob, Mr. Gosman told Christine Sampson of the East Hampton Star. It didn't look real. Oh, but it was a real pearl. What's it really worth? Bryan Gosman told the newspaper, I don't know. It's not about the money; it's just kind of cool.

Mr. Gosman says he intends to auction the chowder pearl during the holiday season to raise funds for the Montauk Food Pantry and to throw a small holiday party for his market staff.

So you might want to take a deep look into your granola bowl this morning. Are those really nuts and raisins, or something more valuable?

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