Electric vehicle charging times make some Americans hesitate : The Indicator from Planet Money People are hesitant to buy electric cars because fast chargers still aren't widely available. The irony? Most people charge at home, not with fast chargers. NPR's Camila Domonoske explains.
NPR logo

Electric Car Chargers: When Supply Drives Demand

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/940172037/940209046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Electric Car Chargers: When Supply Drives Demand

Electric Car Chargers: When Supply Drives Demand

Electric Car Chargers: When Supply Drives Demand

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/940172037/940209046" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Nathan Stirk/Getty Images
In a 10-point environmental plan to be announced this week, the British government is expected to ban the sale of petrol and diesel cars by 2030, five years earlier than previously committed. (Photo by Nathan Stirk/Getty Images)
Nathan Stirk/Getty Images

Electric vehicles have become an increasingly important part of the automotive industry — and increasingly attractive to the average car-buyer.

The first Nissan Leaf, which launched in 2011, had a range of just 74 miles. These days, many electric cars have ranges of 300 miles or more. And while cost is still an obstacle, prices are projected to go down.

Despite these improvements, there's still a major hurdle to electric car adoption: charging availability. Many people are still hesitant to buy because they're not sure they'll be able to charge their cars reliably — either because fast chargers aren't fast enough or because they still aren't widely available.

The irony? Most people do their charging at home, not with fast chargers.

NPR Business reporter Camila Domonoske joins the show to explain the charging conundrum, how it's being addressed, and what it means for the future of electric vehicles.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter / Facebook / Newsletter.

Subscribe to our show on Apple Podcasts, PocketCasts and NPR One.