Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, Pen Pal Matching Program Takes Off New Yorker staff writer Rachel Syme was writing lots of letters on her typewriter. She asked if anyone would be interested in a pen pal exchange. She created Penpalooza, which has over 7,000 writers.
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Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, Pen Pal Matching Program Takes Off

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Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, Pen Pal Matching Program Takes Off

Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, Pen Pal Matching Program Takes Off

Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, Pen Pal Matching Program Takes Off

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/944128772/944149839" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Yorker staff writer Rachel Syme was writing lots of letters on her typewriter. She asked if anyone would be interested in a pen pal exchange. She created Penpalooza, which has over 7,000 writers.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Noel King. During the pandemic, Rachel Syme started writing lots of letters on her old-school electric typewriter - lots. She asked if anyone would be interested in a pen pal exchange. Syme, who's a contributor to NPR, created Penpalooza, a pen pal matching program, and it's taken off. Penpalooza now has over 7,000 writers. One woman told The Guardian, when my first piece of mail arrived, the excitement I felt was beyond reason. It's MORNING EDITION.

[POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly refer to Rachel Syme as an NPR contributor. She is a New Yorker staff writer.]

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Correction Dec. 8, 2020

In the audio of this story, as in a previous Web introduction, we incorrectly refer to Rachel Syme as an NPR contributor. She is a New Yorker staff writer.