How Many Republicans Trust 2020 Election Results? : The NPR Politics Podcast A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll shows that just one quarter of Republicans believe the election was legitimate; ot was. And: could old-school pork barrel spending be the solution to Washington gridlock?

This episode: correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.

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Most Americans Believe The Election Results—Some Don't.

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Most Americans Believe The Election Results—Some Don't.

Most Americans Believe The Election Results—Some Don't.

Most Americans Believe The Election Results—Some Don't.

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/944685514/944748355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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NOVEMBER 21: Trump supporters clash with counter protesters at the Stop the Steal Rally in Atlanta, GA. Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

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Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

NOVEMBER 21: Trump supporters clash with counter protesters at the Stop the Steal Rally in Atlanta, GA.

Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist survey finds that more than sixty percent of Americans — but just one quarter of Republicans — say they trust the results of the 2020 presidential election.

That comes as President Trump continues to push baseless allegations of electoral fraud as he has for more than a month, even as his lawsuits falter in court. Now, two-thirds of Americans believe that Trump should formally concede to President-elect Joe Biden—a belief shared by fewer than four in ten Republicans.

Other toplines from the survey:

  • Fifty-six percent approve of how the president-elect is handling himself during the transition, somewhat higher than believed the same of Donald Trump in 2016.
  • Roughly two-thirds of Americans said they or someone they know has gotten COVID-19. A similar number say the U.S. government hasn't done enough to help financially.
  • Three-quarters of Americans support the idea of a national mask-wearing mandate.

Also: is old-school pork barrel spending the solution to Washington gridlock? Earmarks, pet project funding tucked inside of other legislation, are finding new support on Capitol Hill after previously being banned.

In a report on the modernization of Congress out in October, House Democrats called for the return of earmarks (well, of "Community-Focused Grant Programs") as a way to incentivize deal-making. But bringing them back will probably require both parties to be invested in the change—neither Democrats nor Republicans want to be seen as stewards of graft. Plus, across-the-aisle support would make it less likely that earmarks become cudgels in partisan combat.

President Obama was famously opposed to earmarks, promising to veto any legislation that included them. It isn't something that President-elect Joe Biden has recently weighed in on.

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Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.
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Adapted for the web by Eric McDaniel.