Ask A Foreign Correspondent : 1A "We are not just reporting, as our fellow correspondents do here for the U.S.," White House correspondent for MVS Noticias Bricio Segovia says. "We are translating concepts. That comes with an extra challenge."

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Ask A Foreign Correspondent

Ask A Foreign Correspondent

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Chris Vela of Nevada carries a Biden-Harris flag and an American flag as supporters of Joe Biden prepare to hold a car parade to celebrate the outcome of Tuesday's election on in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Chris Vela of Nevada carries a Biden-Harris flag and an American flag as supporters of Joe Biden prepare to hold a car parade to celebrate the outcome of Tuesday's election on in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Ethan Miller/Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The United States can sometimes feel incomprehensible, even to people who we live here. Imagine trying to translate the complexities of America to non-Americans.

That's the daily work of foreign correspondents working in the U.S. They're a small group with a big job. During election years, that job gets a lot bigger.

How are they explaining the United States in 2020 to their readers and listeners?

Journalists Nadia Bilbassy, Bricio Segovia, and Larry Madowo to talk about how foreign correspondents take in—and explain—the news.

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