Designing Our World: When The Customer Actually Comes First : 1A How many companies really get to know their customers before launching a product? A lot of businesses would say they do. But design thinkers disagree.

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Designing Our World: When The Customer Actually Comes First

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Designing Our World: When The Customer Actually Comes First

1A

Designing Our World: When The Customer Actually Comes First

Designing Our World: When The Customer Actually Comes First

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/944884945/950474962" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The perfect place to practice design thinking... Evening Standard/Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Evening Standard/Evening Standard/Getty Images

The perfect place to practice design thinking...

Evening Standard/Evening Standard/Getty Images

You know the popular saying: "The customer always comes first." But how many companies really get to know their customers before they launch a product?

A lot of businesses would say they do. But design thinkers disagree.

For years, design thinking — or human-centered design — makes a framework for businesses that puts customers' needs at the center of their work. Through innovation bootcamps and training seminars, these consultants promise to bridge the gap between creator and user.

We wrap up the series "Designing Our World" by talking to Michael Hendrix, Kate Canales, Doug Dietz, and Jennifer Brandel about whether design thinking is the best way for companies to solve complex problems and turn a profit.

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